Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How do I get CPU hashrate from passmark test results

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How do I get CPU hashrate from passmark test results

    Our product uses intel i9-12900K CPU, The customer requires that my CPU hashrate must be greater than 200KDMIPS, I used passmark to test the results as follows. May I ask how to know whether our CPU meets the customer's requirements? Which project test is the computational hashrate reflected in?Click image for larger version

Name:	I9-12900K.jpg
Views:	209
Size:	319.3 KB
ID:	55156

  • #2
    No test in PerformanceTest will convert to DMIPS or hash rate.

    Dhrystone MIPS (Million Instructions per Second) is the result from running a Dhrystone benchmark. To get that value you'll have to run their benchmark. However, Dhrystone is considered outdated now.

    Hash rate is typically associated with mining, but the hashrate will depend on what algorithm is used. So, you may want to consult with your customer on their exact requirements.

    Some commonly used hash algorithms are MD5, SHA1, SHA256.
    Bitcoin uses SHA-256​.

    The Encryption test in PerformanceTest does in fact use SHA256 hash as one of the sub-tests. But the overall Encryption test result in PerformanceTest is a combination of AES, SHA256 and ECDSA performance.

    Comment


    • #3
      If I want to tell my customer what my Integrated computing power is? Which Test project needs to refer to the Passmark performance Test results?
      In addition, often said CPU computing power is the ability to support algorithm encryption or decryption?

      Comment


      • #4
        Integrated computing power
        This isn't a well defined computing term. There is no exact definition for what this is. So hard to give a good reply.

        often said CPU computing power is the ability to support algorithm encryption or decryption
        No, this is not often said. Computing power is not the same as the support for doing encryption.
        (and there are dozens of different types of encryptions and hashing algorithms)

        Encryption performance is important, but so are dozens of other computing tasks. For the assessment of a CPUs general overall performance you should consider more than just encryption.


        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by David (PassMark) View Post

          This isn't a well defined computing term. There is no exact definition for what this is. So hard to give a good reply.



          No, this is not often said. Computing power is not the same as the support for doing encryption.
          (and there are dozens of different types of encryptions and hashing algorithms)

          Encryption performance is important, but so are dozens of other computing tasks. For the assessment of a CPUs general overall performance you should consider more than just encryption.

          ok, I see
          I see the following ways to measure CPU performance, and we want to know how to get this performance in the red box
          Click image for larger version

Name:	CPU.png
Views:	175
Size:	168.6 KB
ID:	55168
          I used other software to test and found a multi-processor test value, but I did not see it in Passmark performance. I am not sure whether this is the calculation force.
          Click image for larger version

Name:	SiSoftware Sandra Lite i5-8500.png
Views:	172
Size:	155.5 KB
ID:	55169

          Comment


          • #6
            and we want to know how to get this performance in the red box
            This was already answered.
            But the Dhrystone ​benchmark is around 40 years old now and has a bunch of issues that result in it not being used anymore.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you for your reply. Some of our customers are asking about these parameters.

              Comment

              Working...
              X